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Archive for the ‘Snow Leopard’ tag

Apple Releases Snow Leopard 10.6.8 Update

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Update 7/25/11: Until Apple released the 10.6.8 Supplemental Update we were recommending that our clients NOT install this update. Now that Apple has addressed the Printing and Font issues, we are now endorsing this update. See our new Blog post for details.

Here’s some info from around the web about the 10.6.8 problems:

10.6.8 update issue roundup

http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/11/06/28/xserve_users_report_performance_issues_after_apples_mac_os_x_10_6_8_update.html

http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13727_7-20074767-263/how-to-fix-printers-not-working-in-os-x-10.6.8/

http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13727_7-20074227-263/security-tool-hands-off-causing-panics-with-os-x-10.6.8/

The 10.6.8 update is recommended for all users running Mac OS X Snow Leopard and includes general operating system fixes that enhance the stability, compatibility, and security of your Mac, including fixes that:

-Enhance the Mac App Store to get your Mac ready to upgrade to Mac OS X Lion

-Resolve an issue that may cause Preview to unexpectedly quit.

-Improve support for IPv6.

-Improve VPN reliability.

-Identify and remove known variants of Mac Defender.

For detailed information and precautions on running the 10.6.8 update from Apple, please visit this website: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4561.

Please see this page for more information on precautions and warning from MacMedics. ALWAYS back up your data, and test your back up before your run ANY Apple Software Update!

For information on the security content of this update, please visit: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1222.

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Written by Dana Stibolt

June 26th, 2011 at 1:32 pm

Snow Leopard OS X 10.6.7 And OpenType PostScript Font Issues

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Update 4/26/11: Apple has released the Snow Leopard Font Update patch that will resolve this troubling issue.

The Snow Leopard Font Update addresses issues displaying and printing certain OpenType fonts and is recommended for all Mac OS X v10.6.7 users.

The update includes fixes that address the following issues:

– Address an issue in which some OpenType fonts don’t display correctly in certain applications
– Resolve issues printing from Preview
– Address an issue with PDF files not opening in third-party PDF viewing applications
– Resolve invalid font errors when printing to PostScript printers

For more information about this update, please visit this website: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4605.

Apple recently released the OS X 10.6.7 update, designed to improve Back to My Mac reliability, resolve SMB connection issues, and address other minor problems. Unfortunately, this update introduced a major problem for designers working with OpenType PostScript fonts, resulting in garbled output and problems creating PDF files.

With no clear and reliable resolution to this issue just yet, MacMedics is still recommending that anyone needing to work with these fonts avoid applying this update. For clients on our Scheduled Service System, your technician will not be applying this update at this time (you may want to remind your users not to manually launch Software Update).

Although unfortunate, this is an excellent example of why we make our recommendations regarding new updates.

Other recently released updates:
iTunes 10.2.2
Safari 5.0.5
Security Update 2011-002 for Snow Leopard*, Leopard, and Leopard Server.

*As this update requires OS X 10.6.7, MacMedics recommends that Snow Leopard users hold off on this update until a resolution for the 10.6.7 font issue is available.

This Blog post seems to be attracting quite a bit of attention, so if this is the type of Macintosh information you like, please consider signing up for the MacMedics email newsletter (That is where this post came from). Also, we are quite active on Twitter and Facebook, so if you want info like this as soon as it becomes available, both of those outlets are a good place to watch.

Apple Releases Snow Leopard 10.6.5 – Back Your Hard Drive Up Before You Install

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Apple has released Snow Leopard 10.6.5. This is a MAJOR software update and it should installed ONLY if you have a TESTED and WORKING back up system, and that you’re not in the middle of a production deadline.

Our advice for MacMedics clients regarding this update, is NOT to install it right away. We recommend waiting at least a few days before installing it. Also, if you have multiple Macintosh computers that need this update, just install it on one computer to start. If you’re a MacMedics client that we see on a regular basis, we will install this update for you when it has been fully vetted.

URGENT: Every time Apple releases a software update, we see several dead hard drives the next day. Please read our UPDATE WARNINGs page which can be found here, before you install this software update.

The 10.6.5 Update is recommended for all users running Mac OS X Snow Leopard and includes general operating system fixes that enhance the stability, compatibility, and security of your Mac, including fixes that:

Improve reliability with Microsoft Exchange servers

Address performance of some image-processing operations in iPhoto and Aperture

Address stability and performance of graphics applications and games
Resolve a delay between print jobs

Address a printing issue for some HP printers connected to an AirPort Extreme

Resolve an issue when dragging contacts from Address Book to iCal

Address an issue where dragging an item from a stack causes the Dock to not automatically hide

Resolve an issue with Wikipedia information not displaying correctly in Dictionary

Improve performance of MainStage on certain Mac systems

Resolve spacing issues with OpenType fonts

Improve reliability with some Bluetooth braille displays

Resolve a VoiceOver issue when browsing some web sites with Safari 5

For detailed information on this update, please visit this website: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4250.

For information on the security content of this update, please visit: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1222.

Apple Releases The Much Anticipated Snow Leopard 10.6.3 Software Update

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Apple released the much anticipated 10.6.3 software update today. I have included the info from Apple followed by the MacMedics list of software update precautions. Please don’t install this update until you are 100% sure your back-up is working and tested!

Here is the info straight from Software Update:

The 10.6.3 Update is recommended for all users running Mac OS X Snow Leopard and includes general operating system fixes that enhance the stability, compatibility, and security of your Mac, including fixes that:

Improve the reliability and compatibility of QuickTime X

Address compatibility issues with OpenGL-based applications

Address an issue that causes background message colors to display incorrectly in Mail

Resolve an issue that prevented files with the # or & characters in their names from opening in Rosetta applications

resolve an issue that prevented files from copying to Windows file servers

Improve performance of Logic Pro 9 and Main Stage 2 when running in 64-bit mode

Improve sleep and wake reliability when using Bonjour wake on demand

Address a color issue in iMovie with HD content

Improve printing reliability

Resolve issues with recurring events in iCal when connected to an Exchange server

Improve the reliability of 3rd party USB input devices

Fix glowing, stuck, or dark pixels when viewing video from the iMac (Late 2009) built-in iSight camera

For detailed information on this update, please visit this website: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4014.

For information on the security content of this update, please visit: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1222.

Running a software update from Apple (or elsewhere) as soon as it pops up is not always the best plan. In our travels we very frequently see clients who have run a software update without planning ahead for it, and as a result end up with annoying issues, sudden incompatibilities, and even data loss. One thing to consider is how healthy your hard drive is overall before running an update. Never try to solve an issue such as system lock ups or crashing by installing the latest update, as symptoms like those can be exasperated by applying a software update.

Here’s our safety checklist for running software updates or installing a system upgrade.

1. Back up your data, and double check your back up before installing any update. [Don’t forget to unplug that back-up before installing an update]

2. Repair permissions – It’s not going to hurt anything, so a quick permission repair is always a good idea.

3. Disconnect any USB or FireWire hard drives, devices, or hubs.

4. Make sure you have enough free space on your hard drive – A safe bet is to have 10% of your total hard drive free.

5. Quit all applications while running software updates. The updates should be the only process running.

6. Consider the possibility that major applications and/or features might be affected by an Apple software update or system upgrade.

Don’t run a software update on a production machine while on a deadline. You want to be certain that the update will not cause more problems than it was designed to fix. If your machine is working, let it continue working as is, and plan to install the update after you know it’s not going to cause any issues for you.

We install the updates on our test machines here at MacMedics as soon as they are released to Apple Developers, and again when they are released to the public. Let us be the guinea pigs. We’ll let you know how we feel about the update in our weekly e-mail to MacMedics clients.

Can your hard drive handle Snow Leopard (or the latest major update)???

Installing a new OS is like taking your hard drive to the gym. It can be quite a workout for an older hard drive, and whenever a new OS comes out, we always see a few dead hard drives as a result. No matter what you do, make sure you have a back up of your data before you begin!

Prices have dropped significantly on hard drives over the last year or so. MacMedics now recommends retiring hard drives after three years in desktops, and two years in laptops. Be sure to check out our web page to find out why you should retire your older hard drive and to learn about our 5 rules of data protection and preservation. Why take a chance with your data when faster, larger, and generally more reliable drives are available. Moving to Snow Leopard is a great opportunity to get a new drive, while at the same time insuring your data is safe.

Written by Dana Stibolt

March 29th, 2010 at 9:54 pm

MacMedics Frequently Asked Macintosh Service Questions: Is The Power Mac G5 Still Suitable For Designers?

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The Power Mac G5 is really pretty much over in terms of being powerful enough for someone who is doing professional design work. We have very few clients left still doing professional design work on G5’s. Some of the more recent Power Mac G5’s are “okay” for some use, but at this point, it’s really time to move on. In some cases, even the Mac Mini is a better machine in certain situations. If someone comes to us with a Power Mac G5 that needs, more RAM, a new hard drive, AND wants to also upgrade to Leopard, it’s pretty much not even worth it. Leopard (10.5) is the last OS that will run on the G5 and is no longer available for sale from Apple. With a Mac Mini you get a new OS (10.6) and iLife ’09 for free. A new Mini is only $599. Same holds true for a unit that needs a major repair, in almost all cases a repair is not worth pursuing.

If you “retire” a Power Mac G5 you can reuse your keyboard and mouse, and in most cases your monitor too with the new Mac Mini.

Now that the new iMacs can support up to 8 GBs of RAM, even the low end one is pretty nice for a designer (it now is 21.5″ and has a great display), but the high end iMacs are even better for design work with better video performance and a 27″ display. You can get one with a Quad-Core processor for $2000.

Some of the G5’s are now on Apple’s “Vintage” list and we’ll start having issues finding parts here pretty soon. Also, Apple’s newest OS 10.6 (Snow Leopard) won’t run on the Power PC platform.

If you have a G5 and you’re still using it, the hard drive is really beyond it’s life expectancy, so if you plan on continuing to use it, the hard drive should be replaced at some point. I have a whole website about hard drive retirement. And, as always make sure you have your data backed up as hard drives seem to have way of dying at the worst possible time.

See my web page about why you should consider “retiring” your hard drive before it fails at: http://www.HardDrivesDie.com

For more facts on why retiring a Power Mac G4 or G5 is a good idea, take a look at this previous MacMedics Blog post from earlier this year.

If you’re thinking about a new Macintosh system for Graphic Design (or anything else!), please give your closest MacMedics office a call. We would be delighted to help you pick out a new model.

MacMedics Frequently Asked Macintosh Service Questions: Snow Leopard Installation

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MacMedics Frequently Asked Macintosh Service Questions: Snow Leopard Installation

Do I need to to back up before installing Snow Leopard?

In a word YES! Whenever you run a minor or major software update, you DO need to have your data backed up (and be sure to have that back up tested as well!).

Time and time again we have clients come in with a major hard drive problem right after they have tried to upgrade their Mac OS.

Run Time Machine BEFORE you run that installer. If you are not on Leopard or Snow Leopard, run a program like SuperDuper to make a clone of your hard drive before you perform your upgrade. Even if you have a Time Machine back up, I highly suggest you have a fresh clone of your hard drive on standby whenever you’re running a major Apple software upgrade. This way if something goes wrong, you have a bootable copy of all of your data. Nice thing about a clone vs. Time Machine is you can boot off it and TEST it BEFORE you run a major upgrade. This way if something goes wrong you can get right back to work by booting off the clone.

Never run an Apple software update when you’re on deadline or have a major project due. Updates should always be performed when you’re not under the gun.

Should I unplug my external backup when installing Snow Leopard?

Yes. In fact MacMedics recommends that all USB and FireWire devices (except your keyboard and mouse) should be unplugged before you run the Snow Leopard installer. That holds true for any software update or upgrade as well.

See our full Snow Leopard upgrade Blog post with all the things you should consider here.

Snow Leopard 10.6.2 is now available via Software Update

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Before you install this or any other software update, be sure to read our Software Update/Upgrade Warning Page which can be found here.

Here’s the text from the Apple Software Update window:

The 10.6.2 Update is recommended for all users running Mac OS X Snow Leopard and includes general operating system fixes that enhance the stability, compatibility, and security of your Mac, including fixes for:

An issue that might cause your system to logout unexpectedly

A graphics distortion in Safari Top Sites

Spotlight search results not showing Exchange contacts

A problem that prevented authenticating as an administrative user

Issues when using NTFS and WebDAV file servers

The reliability of menu extras

An issue with the 4-finger swipe gesture

An issue that causes Mail to quit unexpectedly when setting up an Exchange server

Address Book becoming unresponsive when editing

A problem adding images to contacts in Address Book

An issue that prevented opening files downloaded from the Internet

Safari plug-in reliability

General reliability improvements for iWork, iLife, Aperture, Final Cut Studio, MobileMe, and iDisk

An issue that caused data to be deleted when using a guest account.

For detailed information on this update, please visit this website: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT3874.

For information on the security content of this update, please visit: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1222.

Written by Dana Stibolt

November 9th, 2009 at 4:40 pm

Before installing Snow Leopard be sure to read our Apple upgrade warning page first.

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Update 10/23/13 See our Mac OX X 10.9 (Mavericks) upgrade warnings page here: http://www.macmedics.com/mavericks

Update 1/27/10: This topic was mentioned on the Apple forums. See the link here.

Apple released Snow Leopard to the public on August 28. This new version of OS X leaves behind support for the Power PC and it will only run on Intel based Macintosh computers. It’s faster, smaller in size, and much cheaper then previous Apple operating systems. At $29 it’s a good value and well worth the investment. It’s $29 for the single user, $49 for a 5 user family pack, and Tiger users can upgrade via the Mac Box Set which includes iLife ’09 and iWork ’09 as well as Snow Leopard.

Update 9/12/08: MacMedics has both Snow Leopard and Snow Leopard Family Packs in stock in both Lanham and Millersville locations.

Our initial reaction to Snow Leopard has been good, and most of the MacMedics are running it now and have been using it and testing it for some time. While we are excited for it, we have not yet begun to install it for clients just yet.

Before you take the leap to Snow Leopard (or any other update to Apple’s OS) be sure to read our software upgrade warnings page first. It can be found here, but to get the word our we’ve copied the text of the page to this Blog post.

As noted below, MacMedics also strongly recommends you have a tested and fully functional back up in place BEFORE you install any Apple system software update. Something could go wrong, and you could have a major problem on your hands. Whenever Apple releases a major update to OS X we usually see 4 or 5 clients’ hard drives die that first day. If your hard drive is dying or already unhealthy, the extra hard drive activity needed to install a major update is often all it takes to kill a hard drive. Please see our web page on the subject of hard drive failures.

For more detailed information on installing Apple system updates, please see details below.

Upgrading to Snow Leopard and/or installing any Apple OS X software update

Running a software update from Apple (or elsewhere) as soon as it pops up is not always the best plan. In our travels we very frequently see clients who have run a software update without planning ahead for it, and as a result end up with annoying issues, sudden incompatibilities, and even data loss. One thing to consider is how healthy your hard drive is overall before running an update. Never try to solve an issue such as system lock ups or crashing by installing the latest update, as symptoms like those can be exasperated by applying a software update.

Here’s our safety checklist for running software updates or installing a system upgrade.

1. Back up your data, and double check your back up before installing any update. [Don’t forget to unplug that back-up before installing an update]

2. Repair permissions – It’s not going to hurt anything, so a quick permission repair is always a good idea.

3. Disconnect any USB or FireWire hard drives, devices, or hubs.

4. Make sure you have enough free space on your hard drive – A safe bet is to have 10% of your total hard drive free.

5. Quit all applications while running software updates. The updates should be the only process running.

6. Consider the possibility that major applications and/or features might be affected by an Apple software update or system upgrade.

Don’t run a software update on a production machine while on a deadline. You want to be certain that the update will not cause more problems than it was designed to fix. If your machine is working, let it continue working as is, and plan to install the update after you know it’s not going to cause any issues for you. We install the updates on our test machines here at MacMedics as soon as they are released to Apple Developers, and again when they are released to the public.

Can your hard drive handle Snow Leopard?

Installing a new OS is like taking your hard drive to the gym. It can be quite a workout for an older hard drive, and whenever a new OS comes out, we always see a few dead hard drives as a result. No matter what you do, make sure you have a back up of your data before you begin! Also, don’t forget (or skip over) the important task of TESTING your back up. Time Machine is what many clients are running, and while it works most of the time, it can suffer from issues. It’s very hard to test that a Time Machine back up is totally working, and we often find ones that don’t work. Just keep that in mind when you plan your upgrade.

Prices have dropped significantly on hard drives over the last year or so. MacMedics now recommends retiring hard drives after three years in desktops, and two years in laptops. Be sure to check out new web page to find out why you should retire your older hard drive and to learn about our 5 rules of data protection and preservation. Why take a chance with your data when faster, larger, and generally more reliable drives are available. Moving to Snow Leopard is a great opportunity to get a new drive, while at the same time insuring your data is safe.

Apple’s Snow Leopard now in stock at MacMedics!

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Both MacMedics Baltimore (Millersville) and MacMedics Washington (Lanham) have ample supplies of Apple’s Snow Leopard (Mac OS 10.6) in stock. Stop by to pick one up.

The MacMedics office in Millersville will be open tomorrow, Saturday 8/29 from 10 to 1.